ARCHIVE PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL

For over 100 years Pine Mountain has been focused on enriching lives and connecting people through Appalachian place-based education for all ages.

INDEX TO ARCHIVAL COLLECTIONS

An in-depth digital look at the  Pine Mountain Settlement School ARCHIVE. The collections include photographs, documents, biographies, objects, video and other materials that describe the institution from its beginnings in 1913 to the present day. Many documents are available in FULL TEXT.

Work is ongoing.

ABOUT THE ARCHIVE

OUR VISION

The Vision of the Pine Mountain Settlement School Archive is to provide a voice that will encourage transformations in our relationship to the cultures of the Appalachian region through access to a unique and extensive body of material about a rural settlement school within the region. The rural settlement school movement and its impact on the people of Eastern Kentucky and the Southern Appalachians is a story that has sometimes been misrepresented, romanticized, or only partially understood. We envision an accessible, deep, vibrant and vital resource that will encourage exploration and collaborative dialogue about the hidden and sometimes contested history of rural settlement schools. We envision a broader dissemination of research materials across all public, private, and federal sectors interested in Southern Appalachian cultures and life. more …

OUR ARCHIVAL MISSION

The Pine Mountain Settlement School archival mission supports the institutional mission and strategic planning goals. Our institutional mission continues a long 105-year history of multiple educational and social enrichment programs centered on the local community and beyond. Once a boarding school with a progressive educational curriculum, Pine Mountain School’s recent educational programming has moved away from residential education to multi-faceted offerings of short-term environmental, cultural, medical, social, agricultural, and art and craft programs and workshops. But, the archive has not moved away from, nor will it move away from, a commitment to Pine Mountain as place and people. more …

To visit the main page for the School click the link below. To access the Archive go to INDEX TO ARCHIVAL COLLECTIONS (also at the top of the page).

PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL MAIN PAGE

pinemountain_logo2

https://www.pinemtn.org/


WHAT’S NEW! 2018

NOVEMBER 2018

UPDATE: FAMILIES IN THE PINE MOUNTAIN VALLEY COMMUNITY

Since the Families project began in May 2018, a total of 30 Family pages have been published. Each page brings together information about a family whose members share a common surname (or variant spelling thereof). They are families who have ties to the Pine Mountain valley community in the first two decades of the twentieth century. Each Family page includes photographs and historical highlights, as well as members who were community residents, PMSS workers and PMSS students based on information that has been recorded on the PMSS Collections website.

The number of Family pages continues to grow. Since we introduced this series in WHAT’S NEW! of June 2018 (now archived and continually updated here), we’ve added many more families and updated others. We welcome corrections or additional information from readers. Here are the latest:

BOGGS FAMILY
BROWNING FAMILY
CALLAHAN FAMILY
CAUDILL FAMILY
COMBS FAMILY
COOTS FAMILY
COUCH FAMILY
CREECH FAMILY HIGHLIGHTS
WILLIAM & SALLY CREECH FAMILY
ELY FAMILY
HALL FAMILY
HOWARD FAMILY
HUFF FAMILY
JACKSON FAMILY
LEWIS FAMILY
LEWIS FAMILY, Dosha, John Clyde, Rhoda
NOLAN FAMILY
SHELL FAMILY
STURGILL FAMILY
WILDER FAMILY
WOOTON (WOOTEN) FAMILY
WOOTON FAMILY STUDENTS

For a complete list with links to the pages, go to GUIDE TO FAMILIES IN PINE MOUNTAIN VALLEY COMMUNITY.

OCTOBER 2018

EVERETT K. WILSON A Pine Mountain Study in Civics 1937

Print Shop, c. 1942: Student at printing press (1). Harmon Fdn. movie still.
[pm_harm_094.j

A hand-bound booklet that aimed to prepare students to become civic-minded contributors to their community and culturally experienced adventurers in the progress of humanity.

John Dewey noted: “To keep the eyes on the book and the ears open to the teacher’s words is a mysterious source of intellectual grace.” Everett Wilson, author and teacher, knew how to spread grace all around in this small instructional book.

KITTY RITCHIE

Ritchie family crafts. [dolls_baskets_005.jpg]

Kitty Ritchie came from one of the most well-known ballad-singing families of Kentucky. Music was central to the lives of the Ritchie family. They sang as they went about their house and gardening chores and at family gatherings, a custom that continues to this day. Kitty’s youngest sister, Jean Ritchie, became the most well-known of her siblings as a commercial performer, author, recording artist, composer and folk music collector.

Kitty was born the sixth of 14 children and was one of six Ritchie siblings who attended Pine Mountain School throughout the 1920s. After graduating from Pine Mountain School, Kitty went on to study at Berea (Kentucky) College.

Several of the Ritchies were adept at spinning, weaving, quilting, and basket making. Kitty and her sister Mallie learned from their older sister, May Belle Ritchie (Deschamps) a very special craft that she first saw at Hindman Settlement School. It consisted of the construction of dolls, usually in pioneer costume averaging 10 inches in height, from corn shucks, the dried leaves or “husks” of corn cobs. The Ritchies’ talents have long been widely admired and are kept alive by the succeeding generations of the Ritchie family to this day.  

Read more about Kitty Ritchie and the Ritchie family at:
KITTY RITCHIE Biography
MAY RITCHIE Biography


DANCING IN THE CABBAGE PATCH
Stones, More Stones, and Scalloped Potatoes

Helen Wilmer Stone.” on a stone-strewn path.  047_IV_FN_03a_024

Pine Mountain’s dance with stones started very early as this excerpt from a 1914 letter describes

“Another piece of economy has been the application of the two-birds-with-one-stone theory to the loose stones on our cultivable ground. We have secured building material for two sanitary closets and a fine tool house by gathering wagon loads of obstructive stone from our potato fields. As to rocks, we still have more worlds to conquer and we shall use them for building and retaining walls, paving, and roads.”  Nov. 14, 1914, Letter to Friends from Ethel de Long

Stone soup, dry stack walls, scalloped potatoes, limestone kilns, and more stone stories are included in this blog about Pine Mountain’s stone gifts and obstacles.


 SEE WHAT’S NEW! ARCHIVE for older featured collections


Visit our partnering institution H-Net Commons and H-Kentucky.  

For instructions on subscribing to H-Kentucky go to:

http://networks.h-net.org/node/905/pages/965/subscribing-network


COMMENTS & CONTACT

Comments and feedback regarding the material on this website or on the institutional history are welcomed. Comments directly on the website are not enabled.

Please contact office@pinemountainsettlementschool.com or (606) 558-3571 with your inquiries and comments. We welcome your identification of people and activities on our site and, particularly, corrections to the record.


ACCESS GUIDELINES

PMSS ARCHIVE MISSION STATEMENT (extended)


ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

COLLECTION DONATIONS

DONOR AGREEMENT

ORAL HISTORY RELEASE AGREEMENT

LIFE HISTORY FORM

ORAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION – PRINCIPLES AND BEST PRACTICES

POLICIES & PROCEDURES

USE OF IMAGES RELEASE FORM

USE AGREEMENT (Reproduction Request Form)


ABOUT OCR TEXT

Many of the texts included in this site have been automatically generated using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. In some cases, these texts have not been manually reviewed or corrected.

OCR enables searching of large quantities of full-text data, but it is not 100% accurate. The level of accuracy depends on the print quality of the original publication and its condition at the time of microfilming. Publications with poor quality paper, small print, mixed fonts, multiple column layouts or damaged pages may have poor OCR accuracy.


CITATION OF MATERIALS

Any PUBLIC use of material must properly cite Pine Mountain Settlement School in the following manner:

 “[Identification of Item],” [Collection Name] [Series Number, if applicable]. [date], Pine Mountain Settlement School, Pine Mountain, KY. [date accessed]


STATEMENT REGARDING PRIVACY

The manuscript collections and archival records in the Pine Mountain Settlement School Collections may contain sensitive and/or confidential information derived from historical archives that may be protected under federal and state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers who wish to publish and users who may share material from the Pine Mountain Settlement School Collections are advised by this notice that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in some collections within the Pine Mountain Settlement School Collections without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g. may be a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy if facts concerning an individual’s private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person for which Pine Mountain Settlement School assumes no responsibility.

If you believe that your privacy rights have been invaded please notify the following. 

office@pinemountainsettlementschool.com

OUR PRIVACY POLICY

 


See INDEX TO COLLECTIONS for an overview of collections and series.