ABOUT

Pine Mountain Settlement School is an over 100-year-old institution focused on environmental stewardship, cultural and heritage preservation, health education, and agricultural development in the central Appalachian region.

PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL COLLECTIONS

INDEX TO COLLECTIONS

 An in-depth digital look at the collections associated with the history of the School. The collections include photographs, documents, biographies, objects, video collections and other materials that describe the institution from its beginnings in 1913 to the present day. Many documents are available in FULL TEXT. Work is on-going.

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ABOUT – PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL COLLECTIONS

The programs at Pine Mountain Settlement School have evolved to meet the changing needs of the community and region. Today’s programs focus on environmental education and educational support for students in local schools.

The Pine Mountain Settlement School mission reflects a history of multiple enrichment programs for the local community and beyond. Once a boarding school with a progressive educational curriculum, recent programming has moved away from residential education to multi-faceted offerings of short-term environmental, cultural, medical, social and agricultural courses and workshops.

Though “hidden” and largely inaccessible for many years, the materials in the rich local archive are being organized, digitized and offered in a growing website that contains the School’s historical record. The School’s archive contains many historical treasures regarding life in the Southern Appalachians from 1913 until the present. This website attempts to bring some of these unique holdings to the attention of scholars, former students, former workers and the communities of interest both near and far.


PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL MAIN PAGE

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http://www.pinemountainsettlementschool.com/


WHAT’S NEW!

NOVEMBER

70 YEARS OF SERVICE – RUTH SHULER DIETER

True to the original training she received at Pine Mountain Settlement School, Ruth Shuler Dieter reacted to praise for all the good work she has done by stating, “That’s what life is, it seems to me…to feel like you’ve given something to someone else.” To explore her life and be inspired read about Ruth and her 90 year journey.


MARIAN KINGMAN PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM [Full pages, Parts I – IV]

MARIAN KINGMAN PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS  

MARIAN KINGMAN ALBUM INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS – PART I

MARIAN KINGMAN ALBUM INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS – PART II

MARIAN KINGMAN ALBUM INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS – PART III

MARIAN KINGMAN ALBUM INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS – PART IV

A large and early photograph album has been processed which includes photographs of students, staff members (Marian Kingman, Harriet Crutchfield, Margaret Motter and others), buildings, events and visitors. It captures life at the School during the “Roaring Twenties.” Also included are photographs of Comunity Fair Day, milling sorghum , processing maple syrup and other community activities. The photographs are well preserved and have many images of local families, particularly “Fiddler” John and Louise, the Sol Day family, the Frona [Lewis ?] Cooper family, and others.


OUT OF THE ASHES. The Mary Sinclair Burkham School House I at Pine Mountain Settlement School was dedicated on Thanksgiving Day 1917. It served many functions in its approximate fourteen months’ existence and honored the wishes of the donor, Caroline Burkham of New York, who gave the money for the building in honor of her sister, Mary Sinclair Burkham. The estimated worth of the building was given as $18,000 at the time of its destruction by fire in January of 1919. Unfortunately, the insurance only covered $10,000 of that value. Construction of a new building would cost far more but would also re-site the structure so it would not endanger any other building if it also caught on fire. Out of the ashes of that early tragedy came a new school house, Mary Sinclair Burkham School House II and a renewed determination to build an educational program that would serve the Community and stand the tests of time. Mary Sinclair Burkham School House II was also consumed by fire in 1984. Out of the ashes and the double tragedy, Pine Mountain Settlement School in its 103rd year continues to move forward. Today we give thanks for the resilience of people, for a continued belief in community, and an institution that is dedicated to service, to successful educational programming, and to the power of shared good ideas.

OCTOBER

DANCING IN THE CABBAGE PATCH – XII – FOREST AND FIRES  On  November 28, 1922,  the mountains around Pine Mountain Settlement School caught fire and threatened the entire community.  As reported in the Pineville (Ky.) Sun the terrible fire created a serious re-assessment of the forests and the threat of fire to part of the School’s important resources.  10 students at Pine Mountain, led by Leon Deschamps, the school forester and also the leader of the local Boy Scout troupe put forward a petition which they hoped to forward to Kentucky’s Governor Morrow. The petition was also signed by 19 girls, members of the local Girl Scouts and supplemented by a letter from their Scout Captain, Miss Lucretia Garfield, grand-daughter of President Garfield, who was on the staff of the School as a teacher and Scout leader from 1919 to 1922. The petitioners asked that the Governor establish a forestry service and a state forester to be appointed to Harlan County.  As part of the petition each of the boys who fought the fire, for an estimated 30 hours each, wrote of their personal experience fighting the fire in individual letters attached to the petition. See also:  DESCHAMP’S  ‘PERFECT ACRE.’

ANGELA MELVILLE ALBUM

A large photograph album (334 images) assembled by PMSS staff member, Angela Melville.  Images are duplicated in order to capture the original damaged item and its modification. The Album includes many images from the earliest years of the School.

ANGELA MELVILLE ALBUM II – PART I
ANGELA MELVILLE ALBUM II – PART II
ANGELA MELVILLE ALBUM II – PART III
ANGELA MELVILLE ALBUM II – Part IV
ANGELA MELVILLE ALBUM II – PART VI
ANGELA MELVILLE ALBUM II – PART VII

BIOGRAPHIES COMPLETED 

B.C. “BOONE” CALLAHAN
BRIT WILDER 

SEPTEMBER

CECIL SHARP AND MAUDE KARPELE’S VISIT TO PINE MOUNTAIN This year marks the 100th anniversary of Cecil Sharp and Maude Karpele’s visits to the Southern Appalachians to collect folk songs and dances of the region. Pine Mountain played a significant role in Sharp and Karpeles collecting, but the most important find was a new dance form, the so-called “Kentucky Running Set.” The recollections of the important visit have been reviewed by many noted scholars of Appalachia for the work of Sharp and Karpeles stands as a unique window into the interplay of cultures and the growing number of stereotypes and myths at work in the region. The story of the Sharp-Karpeles visit is a close view into the history of the School in 1917 and the shaping of a legacy that has accompanied the history of the School until today.

** We are especially grateful for the close scrutiny given our commentary by David Millstone, Norwich, Vermont, dance historian and author of the blog DAVID MILLSTONE DANCE and currently President of the Country Dance and Song Society of America. His dedication and that of others to the art of folk dance, keeps this art form joyfully engaged with many communities across the country.

See also: PETER ROGERS’ ACCOUNT OF THE SHARP-KARPELES VISIT TO PINE MOUNTAIN

Pine Mountain will celebrate this important visit in activities at the School in 2017. See the School Schedule and stay tuned!

AUGUST

LITTLE SHEPHERD TRAIL When Marguerite Butler took her hike to Jack’s Gap on August 14, 1914, an ascension of some 2,800 feet up the north face of one of Kentucky’s most unique and rugged mountains, she did not complain. John Fox Jr. didn’t complain either. He memorialized the journey in his The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come about a young man’s coming of age as he traveled from Big Black Mountain across Pine Mountain, down the Kentucky River and into the Civil War. Today many visit the overlooks of Harlan and Letcher counties from atop Pine Mountain by driving along the Little Shepherd Trail. Originally a forester’s trail for quick access to hard to reach forest areas, the trail was upgraded by the CCC in 1933-37 and in 1961-62 an additional 21 miles were added by the Kentucky Division of Forestry staff at Putney, Kentucky. The troubled history of this rustic but noble trail is explored in a description of its past, present and future.

GUIDE TO COMMUNITY FAIR DAYS at Pine Mountain Settlement School explores through photographs, programs, and narratives the nearly 95-year-old tradition held in the Fall at the School. Come join in the celebration on Saturday, August 27, 2016.


Pine Mountain Settlement School Collections Website Launched
on H-Net Commons and H-Kentucky, June 1, 2016

 Dr. Randolph Hollingsworth , Assistant Provost, University of Kentucky; President, H-Net:Humanities & Social Sciences On-Line,H-Kentucky and currently editor of H-Kentucky on a recent visit to PMSS, described the goal of the digital network: [It] “…seeks to create an online collaborative environment to facilitate communication and the exchange or scholarly and pedagogical ideas among teachers, researchers, scholars, advanced students, and related professionals (e.g. local historians, librarians, archivists, genealogists), all in an open, democratic, respectful and non-partisan manner. H-Kentucky especially welcomes those who are interested in Kentucky, as well as those in any history/humanities field who live and/or work in Kentucky.” For instructions on subscribing to H-Kentucky go to:

http://networks.h-net.org/node/905/pages/965/subscribing-network


See also: WHAT’S NEW! ARCHIVE


COMMENTS

Comments and feedback regarding the material on this website or on the institutional history are welcomed. Please contact office@pinemountainsettlementschool.com or (606) 558-3571 with your inquiries and comments. We welcome your identification of people and activities on our site and, particularly, corrections to the record.

Comments directly on the website are not enabled.


ACCESS GUIDELINES


ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

COLLECTION DONATIONS

DONOR AGREEMENT

ORAL HISTORY RELEASE AGREEMENT

LIFE HISTORY FORM
ORAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION – PRINCIPLES AND BEST PRACTICES

RELEASE FOR USE OF IMAGES

USE AGREEMENT (Reproduction Request Form)


ABOUT OCR TEXT

Many of the texts included in this site have been automatically generated using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. In some cases these texts have not been manually reviewed or corrected.

OCR enables searching of large quantities of full-text data, but it is not 100% accurate. The level of accuracy depends on the print quality of the original publication and its condition at the time of microfilming. Publications with poor quality paper, small print, mixed fonts, multiple column layouts or damaged pages may have poor OCR accuracy.


CITATION OF MATERIALS

Any PUBLIC use of material must properly cite Pine Mountain Settlement School in the following manner:

 “[Identification of Item],” [Collection Name] [Series Number, if applicable]. [date], Pine Mountain Settlement School, Pine Mountain, KY. [date accessed]


STATEMENT REGARDING PRIVACY

The manuscript collections and archival records in the Pine Mountain Settlement School Collections may contain sensitive and/or confidential information that may be protected under federal and state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers who wish to publish and users who may share material from the Pine Mountain Settlement School Collections are advised by this notice that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in some collections within the Pine Mountain Settlement School Collections without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g. may be a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy if facts concerning an individual’s private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person.) for which Pine Mountain Settlement School assumes no responsibility.

If you believe that your privacy rights have been invaded please notify the following. 

office@pinemountainsettlementschool.com


See INDEX TO COLLECTIONS for an overview of collections and series.