GLYN MORRIS Guide Speeches, Writings and Publications

Pine Mountain Settlement School
Series 04: Directors
GLYN MORRIS

GLYN MORRIS Guide to Speeches, Writings, Publications

Glyn Morris attending at Citizenship Committee. Grace Rood Album. [rood_054.jpg]

TAGS: Glyn Morris; Directors; Pine Mountian Settlement School; Harlan County, Ky; administrative correspondence; personal correspondence; publications; Pine Mountain Guidance Institute for Rural Youth;


The Director’s office papers, correspondence, publications, talks, and misc. papers of Glyn Morris span a little over a decade from 1931 until 1942.  His work in the establishment of the Rural Youth Guidance Institute is not fully covered in this index. The index captures the currently processed documents of Morris’s years at Pine Mountain Settlement School as well as the period of his enlistment as a Chaplain during WWII and his return to Evarts, Kentucky as Assistant to Harlan County Superintendent of Schools, James A. Cawood. The documents are scattered across the formal collection of “Director’s Office Files” found in the organized and boxed Berea microfilmed records; in the Pine Mountain Settlement School’s general Director’s files; in the Rural Youth Guidance Institute files (partial); and within the correspondence of other Pine Mountain Settlement School staff, students and associates.  The documents associated with Glyn Morris’s are voluminous and often necessarily duplicates across various collections.

In 1977 as Morris reflected on his time at Pine Mountain, he was 72. He was retired and living in Pennsylvania where he was writing his autobiography. He mused

I sometimes ponder, with wonder, as to how the concept of time has changed in my lifetime. From knowing men who fought in the Civil War — my experience covered nearly a century — and who could tell of their experiences, to the space age! How fast can we go and survive?

Morris did not live to know the web and its rapid technology and media development and dissemination. He would have heard us asking the same question: How fast can we go and survive?

SPEECHES, WRITING  (UNPUBLISHED)

1931

Glyn Morris’s first year as Director of Pine Mountain Settlement School can be found in these documents that capture exchanges with his staff, outside resources and previous contacts. Arriving at the school at the age of 27, Morris, with all the eagerness of youth, clearly had grand ideas as he charts a new course for the School. Influenced by his instruction at Union Theological School in New York and the influence of instructors such as Reinhold Niebuhr, and a strong interest in the new educational ideas of John Dewey and others, Morris set about to develop a new educational philosophy for the Settlement School.  In his own words Morris describes that initial transition from the intensely urban environment of New York City to the isolated rural community of Pine Mountain in the Central Appalachians of Kentucky in his 1977 autobiography, Less Travelled Roads

The move from New York to Pine Mountain, Kentucky, took us from one extreme to another; the move meant not only a change in geography, but with respect to surroundings, customs, and methods of living, placed us back into an earlier period of history. We exchanged subways and towering modern buildings and apartment houses for log cabins, muleback and foot travel; the sophisticated environment of Morningside Heights and the pushing crowds of Times Square for the restrained, “furriner-shy” non-talkative mountaineers; Macy’s department store, Fifth Avenue shops for a small, sparsely stocked country store and the “Wish Book” (any mail-order house catalogue — mainly Sears and “Monkey Wards”). Childs’ and Chinese restaurants for cornbread, shucky beans and heavy doses of salt pork and breakfasts with thick gravy. The rush and bustle of the city for the slow pace of the time before the railroads, the place where, as James Still stated, “…men here wait as mountains long have waited.”

1932

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

By 1937 Morris had begun to doubt himself and his reasons for remaining at Pine Mountain. He wrote to his mentor Arthur J. Swift at Union Theological,  “Gladys and I are thinking of leaving Pine Mountain….Now will you tell us in all frankness just what you  think?” He stayed.

1938

Harlan County Planning Council Minutes. Morris served as the Secretary for the Council.

1939

1940

1941

Morris, Glyn. “A Challenge for Today,” an abridgment of a chapel speech by Glyn A. Morris [probably 1941 or early 1942 before his departure for WWII assignment as an Army Chaplain.]

1942

PUBLICATIONS (PUBLISHED)

1931

1932

1933

1934

Morris, Glyn. “Is There Any Further Need of a School Like Pine Mountain Settlement School?”

1935

1936

1937

Morris, Glyn. “Progressive Education in the Kentucky Mountains,” Mountain Life & Work. 06 (October 1937): 5. Copy is re-print for PMSS.

1938

1939

Morris, Glyn.  “Community Service in the Curriculum,” Curriculum Journal, Vol. 10, no. 4, April 1939

1940

1941

1942

Morris, Glyn A. “A Challenge for Today.” Mountain Life & Work. (Winter 1942). Print.

Morris, Glyn. “Private Schools and Democracy.” The American Scholar. 11.2 (1942): 251-252. Print.

1951

Morris, Glyn, and Evarts (KY) High School. Guidance Methods for the Principal. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1951. Print. ( Ed.D thesis).

1952

Morris, Glyn. Practical Guidance Methods for Principals and Teachers. New York: Harper, 1952. Print.

1954

Morris, Glyn. Rural Guidance: Its Special Problems, The Career Development Quarterly, December 1954: 35-37. Print (Permission required)

Morris, Glyn. “A Search for Pupil Viewpoints: How 5 Schools Made Plans Based on Pupil Needs.” The Clearing House. 29.3 (1954): 131-134. Print.

1955

Morris, Glyn. A Guidance Program for Rural Schools. Chicago: Science Research Associates, 1955. Print.

Morris, Glyn. “Rural Guidance: It’s Special Problems.” Vocational Guidance Quarterly. 3.2 (1955): 35-37. Print. (See above for first printing)

1958

Morris, Glyn. The High School Principal and Staff Study Youth. New York: Teachers College, Columbia University, 1958. Print.

1961

Morris, Glyn. Using a Timetable in Educational Guidance. Washington: Dept. of Rural Education, National Education Association, 1961. Print.

1964

Morris, Glyn, and Ernest Gosline. Mobilizing a Rural Community for Mental Health: A Report. Lyons Falls, NY: Lewis County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, 1964. Print.

Morris, Glyn. A Study of Industrial Relations in the United States of America. 20th Century Press for the United States Information Service, 1964. Print.

Strang, Ruth May, and Glyn Morris. Guidance in the Classroom. New York: Macmillan, 1964. Print.

1965

1966

1967

1977

Morris, Glyn. Less Travelled Roads. New York: Vantage Press, 1977. Print.

1994

Morgan, Colin, and Glyn Morris. “The Student View of Tutorial Support: Report of a Survey of Open University Education Students.” Open Learning: the Journal of Open and Distance Learning. 9.1 (1994): 22-33. Print.

1998

Morgan, Colin, and Glyn Morris. Good Teaching and Learning: Pupils and Teachers Speak. New York: Open University Press, 1998. Print.

2000

*Morris, Glyn. Nights and Days with Edmund Wilson: An “Upstate” Friendship. Typescript draft of Glyn Morris’ memoir of his friendship with Edmund Wilson (1895-1972) from roughly 1950 to 1970. Gift of Barbara Morris to Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, in 2000. Unpublished Print.