ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION GREEN BOOK (Early manual for EE Program)

Pine Mountain Settlement School
Series 22: Environmental Education

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION GREEN BOOK
(Early manual for EE Program)

TAGS: environmental education; Pine Mountain Settlement School; Green Book; education; Harlan County, KY; Afton Garrison; Candace Julyan; Mary Rogers; and John Rupe.


 

The GREEN BOOK is a manual created by core staff. Using their combined experience they were instrumental in establishing one of the first Environmental Education outdoor programs in the state of Kentucky at Pine Mountain Settlement School. The Forward to the manual explains how the authors saw the basic purpose of the manual and use of their lesson plans.

FOREWORD

THE GREEN BOOK is a sequence of 12 sample lesson plans, each with background information preceding it. The lesson plans can be adapted to use with elementary, secondary, and older students. At the end of the guide is a supplementary reading list and some additional ways in which the immediate school environment can be used to study the way people relate to their surroundings.

Environmental education has come to mean many different things.
Sometimes, unfortunately, it has involved a separation of two kinds of learning: the learning of awareness and appreciation through the use of the senses; the learning of knowledge — specific truths — through experimentation.

We hope through this guide to help bring the two areas together and to stimulate the learning of additional skills such as that of effective communication. Through ecological concepts, one realizes that “awareness” is necessary not only for aesthetic appreciation but also for the understanding of concrete situations.

In THE GREEN BOOK we emphasize the importance of using concepts or frameworks, to understand the ways that plants, animals, water, soil, air, and people fit together. Each natural system “ecosystem” may be different, but most have underlying similarities. Unless we have a frame of reference for seeing those similarities, and unless we can see, describe, and differentiate among members of each ecosystem, (which plants, what kind of rock material, how big an animal population), we cannot understand how each affects the others.

Principal authors of this guide were Peter Westover and Nat Kuykendall. Also contributing to the writing and editing Of the guide were Afton Garrison, Candace Julyan, Mary Rogers, and John Rupe. The ideas presented in this guide have been collected from many different sources, to whom we are indebted. assistance with several lesson plans we would especially like to thank the State of Kentucky Department of Education and the Title 111 Region 6 Office, E.S.E.A.

Many areas of study were outside the scope of this guide, but are no less important to an understanding of our total surroundings. Other Pine Mountain llesson plans and additional ideas for using local resources study, see Appendix I and Appendix ll. This guide has not been copyrighted and we encourage others to use it reprint it in any way.

This guide has not been copyrighted and we encourage others to use it or reprint it in any way.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1 Observation as an Art
OUTDOOR LOG — Sample Lesson Plan
MY TREE — Sample Work Sheet
1
2
3
2 Classification as a Tool
MAKING A KEY — Sample Lesson Plan
6
7
3 The Ecosystem Concept
AN AREA AS AN ECOSYTEM — Sample Lesson Plan
8
10
4 The Earth as Raw Material for Ecosystems
THE CREATION OF SOIL — Sample Lesson PLan
Stream Volume Table for Measuring Sediment
12
14
16
5 Natural Cycles: What Makes Them Go?
RECYCLING OF LIFE — Sample Lesson Plan
17
18
6 Natural Succession: Mechanics and Terminology
Shade Tolerance of Eastern Forest Trees
NATURAL SUCCESSION — Sample Lesson Plan
19
21
22
7 Populations: Ups and Downs
POPULATION — Sample Lesson Plan
27
29
8 Adaptation: How LIving Things Survive
ADAPTATION  TO CHANGING SEASONS — Sample Lesson Plan
LIFE IN WINER — Sample Lesson Plan
31
33
34
9 People and Ecosystems
MAKING AN IMPACT STATEMENT — Sample Lesson Plan
DIARY OF A CREEK — Sample Lesson Plan
STRIP MINE REPORT — Sample Work Sheet
35
36
38
39
10 30 Books — A Short Reading Guide for Teachers 40
Appendix I: Using School Areas for Study — Addotopma; Suggestions 41
Appendix II: Additional Pine Mountain Activities and Available Lesson Plans 41

GALLERY – THE GREEN BOOK: Teaching Ecological Concepts Outdoors, 1974