ARTS AND CRAFTS Overview

Pine Mountain settlement School
Series 32: ARTS AND CRAFTS Overview
Series 38: ARTS AND CRAFTS Ceramics
Series     : ARTS AND CRAFTS Metalworkig
Series 37: ARTS AND CRAFTS Weaving [See: WEAVING]
Series 39: ARTS AND CRAFTS Woodcraft
Series    : ARTS AND CRAFTS Basketry

ARTS AND CRAFTS GUIDE

019 Quilts. fair_day_1998_018

ARTS and CRAFTS Overview

Art and craft have always gone hand-and-glove with the educational programs at Pine Mountain Settlement School. Further, the School has often attracted individuals who have an artistic eye, ear, or hand and are eager to integrate their artistic knowledge into the programs offered by the institution. Past instructors come quickly to minds such as the lead architect for the School, Mary Rockwell Hook who was an architect, furniture maker, flower arranger, landscape planner, artist, and more. Art teachers such as Alice Carter Shera, and John Adams Spelman III. Woodcrafters such as Boone Callahan, Frank “Unk” Cheney, Bennett and Frances Hall, and many others have left a legacy for later generations. Wherever one looks, the evidence of the trained eye can be found whether in building design, furniture, paintings, ceramics, musical instruments, metalwork and more.

Today, local native talent is found throughout the surrounding Community. Most are descendants of families of the past. Families such as members of the William Causey Family, Bennett and Frances Hall, Matt Boggs, Fern Cornett, Sarah Bailey, Edna Patterson, and many others are now gone but they have left their legacy with their families and with Pine Mountain Settlement.  All the weavers who contributed to the long weaving history of the School, first exemplified by Aunt Sal (Sally Dixon Creech), inspired the founders and many workers who followed their interests. Their art and craft heritage continues to draw weavers to the campus to study the Pine Mountain Settlement School weaving history or try out any of the approximately 24 looms currently used in instruction. Native talent derived from the heritage of family has a depth that cannot be found in standard instruction and both native and “outsider” benefit from the sharing of heritage ideas and skills.

Trained visual artists such as Abby Winch Christensen, John Adams Spelman III,  weavers such as Margaret Motter,  Miss Holtzinger, and others, continue to echo in the instruction at the School. .  Mary Rogers was not formally trained but had a keen eye for nature and its internal artistic presence. She quickly learned the many arts and crafts of the region and transformed it with her mix of Old England and deep religiosity.  The many photographers who helped to shape the artistic eye of students, such as Arthur W. Dodd in the 1930s and 1940s and later, Paul Lynn, who captured the life of Community School students, have enchanted many viewers with his sensitive eye for the eager learners her observed and taught during the mid to late 1960s.  The echoes of so many sensitive souls who prized the value of creativity and the artistic urge while connected with the School can be felt throughout these digital pages.

Ceramics instruction has found many advocates over the years and through their interest ceramics programs waxed and waned at the School. The talents in the art and craft of pottery ranged from the primitive to the expert but the joy of shaping a useful vessel or a joyful form seems to lurk in the creative shadows of the institution. The creative journey— and some would call it “soul” of the artistic spirit, lives on at Pine Mountain Settlement School as an institution and is integral to the institution’s endurance through the decades. It helps to have those whose service and long commitment to the school have kept the arts and crafts associated with woodcraft alive through the years. Matt Boggs and his Homemakers Craft Club was one such enduring craft initiative. He is sorely missed.

The following ART AND CRAFT GUIDE will lead in many research directions.  The various creative talents and urges to create works of art in the Community and at the School have created a wealth of documentation and advocates over the years. The regional creative impulse continues to influence and permeate the environment on the Northside of Pine Mountain.  It is not unusual to find that spirit also carried away by those who have visited, worked, or continue to live within the reach of the School’s artistic enchantment.

The new flock of sheep on the campus suggests that the plans for Sheep to Shawl workshops will yield new ways to tap into the arts and crafts heritage of the institution.


SEE

ARTS AND CRAFTS GUIDE

SEE ALSO

ARTS AND CRAFTS CERAMICS Overview
ARTS AND CRAFTS CERAMICS Guide
DANCING IN THE CABBAGE PATCH Feedsack and Fashion

OBJECT COLLECTIONS Overview 

ARTS AND CRAFTS WEAVING Overview
ARTS AND CRAFTS WEAVING Guide

WEAVING  Fireside Industries and Weaving at Pine Mountain
ARTS AND CRAFTS BASKETRY Overview
ARTS AND CRAFTS BASKETRY Guide
ARTS AND CRAFTS CORN-HUSKS Overview
ARTS AND CRAFTS CORN-HUSKS Guide
OBJECT COLLECTIONS Corn-Husks Dolls
ARTS AND CRAFTS METALCRAFT
ARTS AND CRAFTS METALCRAFT Guide
ARTS AND CRAFTS WOODCRAFT Overview
ARTS AND CRAFTS WOODCRAFT Guide
[guide is under construction]