ARCHIVE Inventory Metadata Location and Description Process

Pine Mountain Settlement School
Series 00:  ARCHIVE
Series 36: Inventory
SITE INVENTORY

SUGGESTIONS:

pmss_drawn_map001

  1. COMPILE A FULL LIST OF BUILDINGS.  VISIT EACH BUILDING AND PHOTOGRAPH FACADE, EACH FLANK, AND REAR OF BUILDING. ENTER AND RECORD TOTAL NUMBER OF ROOMS IN EACH BUILDING. GIVE EACH ROOM A NUMBER, ( i.e. 01-10, etc.). INDICATE THE ORIENTATION OF THE BUILDING IF POSSIBLE. (e.g. North facing)

01  Aunt Sal’s Cabin  [East facing]

02  Barn  [South facing]

03  Big Log  [South facing]

04  Boy’s House (Library)  [South facing]

05  Chapel  [North facing]

06  Country Cottage (Practice House)  [South facing]

07  Creech Farm House (Creech Cottage)  [North facing]

08  Electrical Power House  [East facing]

09  Far House II  [North facing]

10  Farm House  [East facing]

11  Girl’s Industrial Building (Plant Center)  [South facing]

12  Infirmary (Hill House   [South facing]

13  Jubilee Cottage (Doctor’s Cottage)  [South facing]

14  Laurel House II  [North facing]

15  Office  [South facing]

16  Old Log  [South facing]

17  Root Cellar  [East facing] 

18  Swimming Pool Bath Houses  [East facing]

19  Tool House II (Tool Shed II)   [South facing]

20  West Wind   [West facing]

21  Zande House  [North facing]

2.  NEXT DRAW A SIMPLE FLOOR PLAN FOR EACH FLOOR OF EACH BUILDING AND NUMBER EACH ROOM (01 etc.).  WORK FROM BOTTOM TO TOP FLOORS AND IN CLOCKWISE DIRECTION IF POSSIBLE.  INDICATE ORIENTATION OF EACH BUILDING.

3.  NEXT, GIVE EACH WALL  IN EACH ROOM A LOWER CASE LETTER  – a, b, c, d, . FROM THE NORTH WALL WORK IN CLOCKWISE DIRECTION, IF POSSIBLE. IF CLOSET IS ON WALL GIVE CLOSET aa, bb, etc. INDICATE WALL LETTER ON FLOOR PLAN. CEILING (e) AND FLOOR (f) MAY BE INCLUDED IF THEY CONTAIN FIXED OBJECTS FOR INVENTORY.

4.  NEXT, SELECT A BUILDING TO BEGIN INVENTORY. START WITH FIRST FLOOR AND FIRST ROOM NUMBER. FOR EXAMPLE, THE FIRST ROOM IN OFFICE WOULD BE

15.01  (OFFICE – 01 Entry)
15.01.a (OFFICE – 01 Entry – Wall a)

5.  NEXT, ENTER INFORMATION FOR EACH ROOM ON EXCEL DATA WORKSHEET USING SUGGESTED METADATA AND SUGGESTED OBJECTS GUIDE

6.  USE MODIFIED DUBLIN CORE – CONSULT CROSS-WALK TABLE BELOW FOR EXPANSION.

http://www.getty.edu/research/publications/electronic_publications/intrometadata/crosswalks.html


Notes on Broad organization

7.  CONA= CULTURAL OBJECTS NAME AUTHORITY 

The Harvard Fogg Cataloging System formed the early skeleton of art and material culture outlines.  The Harvard Fogg System was based on the cataloging principles of the Metropolitan Museum f Art and was then modified to accommodate local needs of a small but diverse body of material in slide collections and museum collections. Fogg cataloging was generally considered a manual method for giving objects third level cataloging which is the highest level of cataloging for materials and represented at the time, full description. Full description has rapidly morphed over the years as collections realized they could not be locked into fixed schema but needed extensible cataloging or metadata to accommodate diverse collections.Full description may not be practical for Pine Mountain’s collections, but a hybrid approach that borrows from multiple cataloging or metadata schema. The level of description decision is largely a policy matter, but once instituted it should remain consistent throughout the cataloging (inventory) process or access and monitoring may be jeopardized.  Deviations should be carefully considered. CONA is the most comprehensive of these hybrid metadata schemas.

https://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/cona_intro.pdf

CONA BORROWS FROM AND CAN ADAPT TO MULTIPLE SCHEMA

AAT   http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/aat/
CDWA  http://www.getty.edu/research/publications/electronic_publications/cdwa/
VRA Core  http://cco.vrafoundation.org/
MARC   http://www.loc.gov/marc/
MODS  http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/userguide/index.html
CIMI  http://artcataloging.net/cdg/cdg9907.html  [OUTDATED]
DACS  http://www.archivists.org/governance/standards/dacs.asp
http://files.archivists.org/pubs/DACS2E-2013.pdf

CONA allows for equivalent, hierarchical, and associative relationships which means it can be readily adapted to specific collections and mapped to a standard such as DUBLIN CORE (See Cross-Walk, above) to maintain interoperability across databases.


8.  To be EXTENSIBLE the database must be able to address multiple facets.

FACET = A facet is a fundamental, homogeneous, and mutually exclusive category of information in a thesaurus (for example, the AAT has seven facets:
 Associated Concepts
Physical Attributes (properties)
Styles and Periods
Agents
Activities
Materials
Objects 

Within the facets, there will be discreet facets, such as OBJECT FACETS.  See for example

OBJECT FACETS = The Objects facet encompasses discrete tangible or visual things that are for the most part produced by human endeavor or otherwise fabricated or given form by human activity.

9.  The INVENTORY DATABASE benefits from the ability to be extensible across ALL collections.  The BROAD RANGE OF COLLECTIONS at  Pine Mountain include the following [subject to revision]

ARCHITECTURAL COLLECTIONS

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS
REPRODUCTIONS OF MARY ROCKWELL HOOK DRAWINGS
MISC. OTHER ARCHITECTURAL PLANS, SCHEMATICS, DRAWINGS

ART COLLECTIONS

DRAWING, PRINTS, WORKS ON PAPER
PAINTING
MINOR ARTS BY MEDIUM
MINOR ARTS BY OBJECT
SCULPTURE
TEXTILE ARTS
DIGITAL ARTS

BOOK COLLECTIONS

GENERAL BOOK COLLECTIONS
HELEN de LONG BOOK COLLECTION
KATHERINE PETTIT BOOK COLLECTION
EE SCIENCE BOOK COLLECTION
CHILDREN’S BOOKS & LITERACY EDUCATION MATERIALS

**DOCUMENTARY COLLECTIONS (ARCHIVE or PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL COLLECTIONS)

FARM COLLECTIONS (ALL IMPLEMENTS, TOOLS, EQUIPMENTS, SEEDS ASSOCIATED DIRECTLY WITH FARMING OR THE DAIRY

DAIRY

INDUSTRIAL ARTS COLLECTIONS  (WOODWORKING, EQUIPMENT, TOOLS, WINDOW WORKSHOPS, ETC.

MAINTENANCE
WOODWORKING
MECHANICS

MAPS  (INCLUDES USGS MAPS, ROAD MAPS, ETC.)

USGS
ROAD
PROPERTY
MISC.

NATIVE AMERICAN COLLECTIONS (ALL ITEMS ASSOCIATED WITH NATIVE AMERICANS AND RELATED EE PROGRAM MATERIAL)

FLINT OBJECTS
STONE OBJECTS
ANIMAL SKINS
HORN

PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTIONS  (INCLUDED IN PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL COLLECTIONS (ARCHIVES))

RECREATION COLLECTIONS  (EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATED WITH RECREATION AT SCHOOL)

PLAYGROUND
COMMUNITY OUTREACH

SCIENCE COLLECTIONS (LARGELY ALL COLLECTIONS AND MATERIALS ASSOCIATED WITH PLANT CENTER AND EE PROGRAMMING)  [include all under EE COLLECTION ?]

BOTANICAL COLLECTIONS
INSECT COLLECTIONS
BUTTERFLY COLLECTIONS
CONSERVATION  [http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/11-     08.pdf]
REPTILE COLLECTIONS
LIVING
DEAD
[HELP IS NEEDED HERE]

TECHNOLOGY COLLECTIONS (ALL EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATED WITH TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE, OFFICE EQUIPMENT, ROUTERS, TELEPHONES, TIME-CLOCKS [PUNCH CLOCKS ?], ETC.)

RECENT TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT? PAPER-WORK AVAILABLE?

WEAVING COLLECTIONS [TEXTILE COLLECTIONS ?]  (INCUDES ALL MATERIALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE WEAVING, SPINNING AND TEXTILE ARTS AT PMSS] [LOOMS, SPINING WHEELS,CARDING PADDLES, BOBBINS, YARN, ETC]

TOOLS
YARNS
WEAVINGS
DYES


10.  Collections contain a variety of materials. The following is a partial list that may be rearranged and expanded as inventory progresses but should form a controlled vocabulary FOR DESCRIPTION. Should take into consideration the following

Record Type: An indication of if the work is a movable work or a built work; other organizational Catalog Levels may be assigned by the Vocabulary Program.  Most of the INVENTORY concerned with MOVABLE WORK.

Catalog Level: An indication of the level of cataloging represented by the record, based on the physical form or intellectual content of the material; controlled list, [controlled vocabulary]  may be extensible.  Most of the INVENTORY at PMSS will be concerned with PHYSICAL FORM but needs to have a controlled list of terms

Classification: Placement of a work of art or architecture within a broad classification scheme that groups other, similar works together on the basis of similar characteristics; usually assigned by the repository; see CONA documentation. Is extensible. 

architecture
paintings
sculpture
graphic arts
textiles
costume
furniture
vessels
decorative arts
art tools
science
ceramics
toys
Native American art
etc

Object/Work Type: The kind of object or work described, may include physical form, function, purpose, or allusion to subject matter, depending upon the conventions in a given discipline or area of art history; typically more specific or different than Classification, but occasionally may be the same as Classification. Controlled vocabulary.  See AAT. EXAMPLES:

refectory table
carpet
drawing
poster
candelabra
etc.


FOR EXAMPLE   (limited example)

01  ARCHITECTURE

General Diagrams
Architectural details
Site-specific  (rock walls, pathways, signage, brass plates, memorials, graves [?],etc)

02  SCULPTURE

Free Standing
Bas Relief
High Relief
Figurine
Kinetic Sculpture  9object moves)
Assemblage
Bust
Environmental Scupture
Garden Ornament
Mobile
Tondo

03  PAINTING

Frescoes
Mosaics
Tapestry

04  DRAWING, PRINTS, WORKS ON PAPER

Advertising art
Billboards
Book & Magazine Covers
Book, Magazine & Portfolio Illus.
Calligraphy
Calendars
Cartoons
Cards- Greeting
Cards-Playing
Cards-Trade
Drawings
Manuscript Covers
Newspaper Illus.
Prints
Posters
Program Covers

05  MINOR ARTS BY MEDIUM

Bronze
Ceramics
Enamel
Glass
Ivory
Jade
Leather
Metacraft (excludes jewelry and coins)
Paper
Wallpaper
Rock Crystal
Stained Glass
Stonework

TEXTILES – WEAVING

Appliques
Carpets
Clothing
Coverlets
Lace
Quilts
Table Runners
Weaving, Misc.
Yarns

Wood
Lacquer
Marquetry

MINOR ART BY OBJECT

ECCLESIASTICAL SUBJECT MATTER
Crosses
Candelabras, Candleholders, Lamps
HOUSEWARES – COOKING AND EATING IMPLEMENTS
Cup, Mug, Tumbler, Glass, Goblet, Drinking Container
Plate, Platter, Dish, Tray
Basin, Bowl
Cooking Dish, Pot, Serving Vessel, Jug
Forks, Knives, Spoons
Coffee, Tea Service
Churn
Kitchen Utensils (assorted)

CONTAINERS
Boxes
Planters, Flower pots
Vases, Urns, Ritual Vessels, Buckets
Ewer, Flask, Jar, Bottle, Pitcher, Flagon, Amphora
Purse, Pouch, Mail Bags
Escutcheon
Baskets

WEAPONS
Guns
Knives
Powder Horns
Bows & Arrows
Axes, Hatchets (not Native American)

JEWELRY

MISCELLANEOUS
Musical Instruments
Dulcimers
Tools, Telephones, Communications equipment
Games and Toys
Building Materials, (Bricks, Morter, etc.)
Clothing
Men’s
Women’s
Children’s
Headgear
Footgear
Canes, Walking Sticks, Umbrellas
Writing Equipment
(Inkwells, paper-weights, pens, paper-holders, etc.)

FURNISHINGS
Couch or Sofa
Settee
Settle
Sofa and Chairs
Bench
Meridienne
Chaise, Daybed, Restbed
Bed
Seats
Chairs
Chair – Hickory Bottom
Armchairs
Chair and Stool
Stools
Misc.
Tables
Consoles or Side Tables
Dining Tables
Dressing Tables
Game Tables
Misc. Small Work Tables (sewing, reading, tea, etc)
Table with Bench group
Table and Chair group
Table and Mirror group
Desks
Secretary
Writing Table
Typewriter Table
Bureau Plat
Chests or Coffers (Storage and Display)
Buffet (when not a table), Sideboard, Server
Chest of Drawers, Bureaus, Chiffoniers
Commode
Cupboard, Wardrobe, Armoire, China Cabinet
Bookcase, Highboy, Etagere and other cabinets that usually have
drawers and shelves

LAMPS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES

Candle Holders
Lanterns
Oil Lamps
Fixed outdoor lighting

MISCELLANEOUS (Stoves, Groups)

Accessories
Carpets
Chimney Groups
Clocks
Fire Screens
Knockers
Mirrors
Screens
Wall Furnishings

BEDDING, SPREADS, BLANKETS, SHEETS, ETC.

[Housekeeping inventory ?]

ARCHITECTURAL AND FURNISHING DETAILS

Built-in furniture, art furniture (West Wind, for example)
Plaques, Disks, Decorative tiles
Finials, Feet, Pole tops, Bosses
Bridle and Harness Ornaments and Mounts
Masks

09  NATIVE AMERICAN ART

Axes
Mortars & Pestles
Projectiles
Atl-atls
Animal skins

11.  DATABASE SAMPLE

EXCEL DATABASE
ACCESS DATABASE
HARD DRIVES (1TB, for examp)