WELLS RECORD 06 PMSS Some Interesting Gifts 1913-1928

Pine Mountain Settlement School
Series 09: Biography – Staff/Personnel
Series 04: Pine Mountain Settlement School Histories
Series 10: Built Environment

WELLS RECORD 06 PMSS Some Interesting Gifts 1913-1928

“WELLS RECORD 06 PMSS Some Interesting GIfts 1913-1928” is a record of selected gifts to the Pine Mountain Settlement School from 1913 until 1928. This narrative was written by Evelyn K. Wells, PMSS Secretary 1916–1931 and Interim Director 1931.


 TAGS: Evelyn K. Wells ; Pine Mountain Settlement School ; records ; gifts ; settlement schools ; histories ; 1913-1928 ; Elizabeth C. Hench ; William Creech ; Ethel de Long Zande ; Katherine Pettit ; Hindman Settlement School ; Mary Rockwell Hook ; Stephen Gilbert ; Turner Turner ; Luigi Zande ; Andy Dorsky ; Oscar Begley ; Chris Anderson ; WWI ; Great Depression ; stonework ; masonry ; craftsmanship ; Italians ; Laurel House I ; Chapel ; Barn ; Darwin D. Martin ; Reservoir ; farm ; farming ; Mary Sinclair Burkham School House ;


The first gift of money to Pine Mountain was from the Missionary Society in the Hindman School which, after a serious discussion of the claims of the child widows of India, the Lepers and one or two other interests, decided in favor of the new school for Mountain children which Miss [Katherine] Pettit and Miss [Ethel] de Long were about to start. The speech that swayed the vote to Pine Mountain was made by Stephen Gilbert, a Hindman boy who has since become a minister and made two or three visits here preaching in our church. The amount voted was the entire balance in their treasury, forty-five cents!

Uncle William Creechs gift of land is mentioned in the introduction, but there have been other gifts, notably from Columbus Creech and Henry Creech, who gave us the land back of the School running to the top of Pine Mountain.

Col.  J.C. Durrett of Midway, Kentucky, gave us a pair of mules with their harness in 1913 and many substantial contributions of money. We bought the Wilder Property at the head of Isaac’s run with his money, also the Little Laurel Farm.

Money for buildings has been given as follows:

Laurel House I $6,000 Through Mrs. Morton [Board member], in memory of her father Mr. Howard Gratz.
Far House I 1,000 From Mrs. William Pettit in memory of Mr. William Atchison.
Mary Sinclair Burkham Schoolhouse 6,000 In memory of Miss Burkham by her sister, Miss Caroline Burkham of New York. (Miss Mary Burkham was much interested in all work for needy children and met Miss de Long just before her final illness.)
Reservoir 3,000 From Mrs. Mary Emery of Cincinnati.
Medical Settlement [Big Laurel] 5,000 From Mrs. Mary Emery os Cincinnati.
Boy’s House 12,000 From J.S. Duncan of Chicago.
Infirmary 3,000 Multiple donors: S.L. Sewall, Minneapolis ; Mrs. David G Tyler, Philadelphia ; Miss Sarah Bremer, Boston ; Mrs Annie Swift, Chicago ; Mr. Seymour van Santvoord, Troy, NY ; Mrs. John S. Kennedy, New York ; Mrs A.F. Schauffler, New York ; Mrs. L.C. Fenno, Boston ; Mr. J.G. Seaman, California.
Country Cottage 1,000 From the New York Auxiliary of the Southern Industrial Educational Association.
Chapel 13,000 Given by Miss Jessie Munger of Plainfield, N.J. in memory of her aunt, Charlotte F. Hedges.
Little Log House [Dr.s Cabin] 200 For Little Log House, from Mr. Martin [Darwin D. Martin], Buffalo, NY.

We remember as typical of the generous gifts that have equipped the school and maintained it, the seed which came for years from  J.C  McCullough of Cincinnati, the farm implements always forthcoming at our request from the B.F. Avery Plow Co., through Mr. C.F. Huhlein of Louisville, the window glass that came for years during our construction period from Capt. Charles W. Brown of the Pittsburgh Plate & Glass Co., the bathtubs and other plumbing fixtures from the Ahrens and Ott Company, the furnishings of a thousand varieties from toasting forks to the Ford truck, that came every time Mr. Martin [Darwin D. Martin] turned us loose in the Larkin Catalog.

Ford Truck donated by Darwin D. Martin, 1920s. [cobb_alice_012.jpg]

One of the first gifts to the school and one of elemental importance was Miss Helen Kimball’s money which bought the Sawmill. All the lumber for the Big Log House was given and sawed by the Creech brothers. Most of the money for the building of the Swimming Pool was raised by the Pine Mountain children who ate dinners of rice and cocoa every Friday for a year, saving the money of their regular dinner.

Most of the firms, who early in our history gave us actual equipment, changed their policy after the War [WWI], preferring then to give us a money gift.

“Drinking Fountain.” Kendall Bassett Photograph Album, c. 1928-29. [pmss_bas061.jpg]

The Memorial Tablet to Uncle William, set in the fountain [William Creech Memorial Fountain] on the Playground, was the gift of Philip Roettinger of Cincinnati. Another interesting gift prompted by admiration for Uncle William was that of $100 every Christmas for four years, from Mrs. George H. Bruen, to be used for a book for every child in the school, “in memory of their friend, William Creech.”

The Log Cabin [Aunt Sal’s Cabin] which was the pioneer home of Uncle William and Aunt Sal was given us by the Creech heirs, and will be furnished by their gift of the “household gear” belonging in the first days of their marriage to that couple.

[Aunt Sal’s Cabin]. c. 1940s?. [nace_1_078d.jpg]

We have spoken elsewhere of the generosity of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad in giving passes for all medical and surgical cases.

In 1926 a bequest from the estate of Mrs. Crane of Montclair made possible an expensive piece of land reclamation, putting almost another acre into garden land to the west of the road from the Pioneer Cabin [Aunt Sal’s Cabin] to the Toolhouse [Toolhouse I], which had formerly been a wide ditch.

Tool House I. Distant view with road leading to tool shed. [II_5_old_log_office_213a.jpg]

Miss Elizabeth Hench formed the Joy Stock Company from a group of her friends in 1921, and her sprightly letters to her growing membership have resulted in the support of the Cow Joy and her daughters at the School ever since.

The Ayrshire herd grazing at the knoll. Arthur W. Dodd Album. [dodd_A_009_mod.jpg]

Mary Rockwell Hook has always put her talents and training at our disposal drawing plans for our buildings and making the trip from Kansas City to Pine Mountain for consultation.


SEE: 

EVELYN K. WELLS Biography

 DARWIN D. MARTIN Biography

ELIZABETH HENCH GUIDE TO THE COW LETTERS

GUIDE TO ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS AT PINE MOUNTAIN

SEE ALSO: 

EVELYN K. WELLS GUIDE TO ADMINISTRATIVE CORRESPONDENCE

EVELYN K. WELLS, GUIDE to EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS HOME 1915-1923

EVELYN K. WELLS 1915 EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS HOME 

EVELYN K. WELLS 1915 EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS HOME – Horseback to Hindman

EVELYN K. WELLS 1916 EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS HOME

EVELYN K. WELLS 1917 EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS HOME

EVELYN K. WELLS 1918 EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS HOME 

EVELYN K. WELLS 1919 EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS HOME

RECORD OF PINE MOUNTAIN SETTLEMENT SCHOOL 1913-1928 [INDEX] (Early in-depth history of Pine Mountain Settlement School)

Foreword

2.        Introductory

3.          Year by Year [Construction, Workers, Gifts, Children, Events, etc.]

4.          Physical Growth

5.          Support and Budget

6.          Some Interesting Gifts

7.          Industrial and Vocational

8.          Farm – Dairy – Poultry

9.          The Country Cottage

10.        Academic

11.        Health

12.        Extension Work

13.        The Fireside Industries

14.        Folk Songs and Dance

15.        Athletics

16.        Dramatics

17.        Some Contributions to the Outside World

18.        Religious Life

19.        The Road

20.        Various Happenings

21.        Policies – General

22.        List of Workers

[22 sections of Pine Mountain Settlement School History gathered by Evelyn K. Wells from 1913 to 1928]

EVELYN K. WELLS PUBLICATIONS

Wells, Evelyn K. The Ballad Tree: A Study of British and American Ballads, Their Folklore, Verse and Music, Together with Sixty Traditional Ballads and Their Tunes. New York: Ronald Press, 1950. Print.

EVELYN K. WELLS “A Little True Blue American,”  Over Sea and Land: Our Southern Mountains, November 1920, p. 140.

EVELYN K. WELLS TALKS

EVELYN K. WELLS PMSS Harvard University talk, on Folk Music. July 21, 1955