GUIDE TO SCRAPBOOK BEFORE 1929

Pine Mountain Settlement School
Series 27 : Scrapbooks

GUIDE TO SCRAPBOOK BEFORE 1929 

The GUIDE TO SCRAPBOOK BEFORE 1929 includes material related to the Pine Mountain area. The publications are linked to pages and are provided in full text if the items are in the public domain.

The Scrapbook Before 1929 is an eclectic aggregate of newspaper clippings, clipped journal articles, photographs, letters, notes, calendars, etc., and was assembled by Pine Mountain Settlement School staff and administrators in the School’s earliest years. It serves as a record of their interests. The Scrapbook Before 1929 also captures the context in which the school evolved during the years from 1913 to the end of 1929.

A second Scrapbook From 1930 was also compiled but due to copyright restrictions. much of the content of this second scrapbook cannot be reproduced in full. This second scrapbook was maintained until the end of the 1950s and was then replaced by clipping files that continue to be collected.


TAGS: scrapbooks ; derived literature ; magazines ; newspaper clippings ; clipping files ;



SCRAPBOOK BEFORE 1929

PAGE 1

Frost, W.G. “University Extension in the Southern Mountains,” [reprint fromOutlook], 1898

Frost, W.G. “Our Contemporary Ancestors in the Southern Mountains,” [reprint from The Atlantic Monthly, March, 1899].

Frost, W.G. “The Southern Mountaineer (Educational Opportunities at Berea),” [reprint from Review of Reviews], 1900.

Frost, W.G. “Views on the Industrial,” [no date, no source]

Frost, W.G. “Educational Rally at Big Stone, ‘The Ladder of Success’, [no date]

Semple, Ellen Churchill. “Anglo-Saxons of the Kentucky Mountains,” [Reprint placed in Pine Mt. file (Semple) June 1901. [Accessed online, Library of Congress 2016-11-02]

Lewis, William. “Indignant Over the Perry County Pardons,” [article from unknown newspaper.]

Frost, W.G. “How to Make Our Children Well-off: Ex-President Frost Tells the “Woman’s Industrial.”

PAGE 2

De Long, Ethel. “Doings on Troublesome,” Smith College Quarterly, 1912

PAGE 3

Bradley, W.A., “The Women on Troublesome,” Scribners, before 1913

PAGE 4

Dangerfield, N.G., “On the Trail of the Wilderness Road, A Story of Quilts and Folks in the Kentucky Mountains,” Lexington Herald, 1919

PAGE 5

Chenault, S.M. “Hindman and Its Settlement School,” Lexington Herald, 1919

PAGE 6

Humble. C. Rev.  “One of the Newer Phases of Our Work. The Bible Reader in the Mountains. p. 154-5 [incomplete article] Cuttings from Missionary Magazine, n.d. [Home Mission Monthly, Vol. 14, p. 154, 1900.]  Available online: Accessed 2015-11-17.

Mills, Alice. M.D. “West Virginia Mountain Notes” by Alice F. Mills, M.D. Cuttings from Missionary Magazine, n.d.

“The Mountaineers” in Over Sea and Land, n.d.,

Pomerory, Diana. “Dorland Institute,” by Miss Diana Pomeroy ;

Williams, Elizabeth R. “Asheville Farm School,” by Miss Elizabeth R. Williams ;

Anon. [no author]  “Home Industrial School,”  ;

Dailey, Harriet. “The Work at Paint Rock,” by Miss Harriet Dailey ;

Merchant, D.J. . [Allenstand Schcool] “Only Two Years Old,” by Miss D.J. Merchant ;

“No Chance” by M.B.N. ;

McCartney, Mary E. . “Patterson Hill,” by Miss Mary E. McCartney ;

Anon. [no author] “Our Bible Readers in the Tennessee Mountains,” ;

“A Bit From Laura Sunderland School,”

Neve, F.W., Rev.  “Some Mountain Missions in Virginia,” by the Reverend F.W. Neve in The Mountain Magazine, n.d.

Neve, F.W., Rev. ” A Mountain Cabin and Its Story,” by Frederick W. Neve (Archdeacon of the Blue Ridge), in Leaflet No. 1, Archdeaconry of the Blue Ridge, Diocese of Virginia, c. 1919. Includes “Toting Fodder…”

Anon.  [No author] “‘Toting’ Fodder for Tuition,” in Comments on Kentucky, n.d.

PAGE 7

Carlin, J.W.  “The Kentucky Mountaineer.” Dear Colliers … Paris, Texas.

Felton,    “A Race of Rip Van Winkles is Waking Up,” World Outlook, 1919

PAGE 8 

Anon. [No author] , “Dream of a Shirt-Tail Boy Come True,” (Miss Pettit and Miss Stone), World Outlook, 1919

PAGE 9

McGowan, A. “Among the Mountaineers of the South, ?, 1921

PAGE 10

Flexner, Hortense. “Are You Too Old To Learn?: The Moonlight Schools of Kentucky,” ?, 1921

PAGE 11

Kirkland, Winifred. “Mountain Music,” 1921

PAGE 12

“The People’s Forum, – Two Letters from Manon Cornett concerning the Versailles affair,”  [More News Clippings, (Assorted)]

“Appeal of Southern Highlands is Subject: Berea College President [Willim Goodell Frost] Speaks in Chautauqua, N.Y, Saturday, August 20, 1921.

“Langley Defends Mountain People,: Tells Congress of His District’s Vast Resources in Speech on Public Building Appropriations Measure. Raps Critics who have been unfair in press.”, 1921

“Incline Railway,” March 24, 1924. [Harlan Daily Enterprise ?]

PAGE 13

“The Book That Was Asked For,” Advertisement for John C. Campbell’s Book,The Southern Highlander and His Homeland, 1921

PAGE 14

L.C. .” A Glimpse of the Kentucky Mountains. (Trachoma) Monitor, c. 1921.

PAGE 15

Hudson, Irene. “School Ma’am of Sandy Ridge,” (See Evelyn Wells’ Letter) , Atlantic, 1920.Includes letter from Evelyn K. Wells protesting the content of Hudson’s article.]

PAGE 16

Pridemore, F., “A Moonshiner on Prohibition,” Outlook, 1923.

PAGE 17

Ross, E.A., “Pocketed Americans,” (2) The New Republic, 1924

PAGE 18

“On the Banks of the Red Bird” [Redbird Settlement, After First Year] newspaper article.

“Painting of First Dwelling on the Site of Lexington Made From Photograph.” [clipping]

PAGE 19

“Ending a Feud Without a Rifle,”(More Clippings) Sergeant York, Highway Magazine, Literary Digest.

Frost, William. “How to Make our Children Well-off: Ex-President Frost Tells the ‘Women’s Industrial,” 1919.

Vaughn, M.E.  “The Tour of Eastern Kentucky,” by M.E. Vaughn, The Citizen (Berea), August 3, 1922.

“Plea Made for East Kentucky: Lexington Physician Says State Is Overlooking Its Greatest Asset by Not Educating Mountain People. Kiwanians hear address. [Source ?]

Pleads for Free Hospital for State Mountain People; Work of Relief Just Begun,” by J. A. Stucky, 1922

“Kentucky Local Color,” Christian Science Monitor, August 14, 1922

PAGE 20

“Lighting Up the Southern Mountains, (Mountain Missions), Literary Digest, Vol. 72, p. 32, March 4, 1922, p32-33. (2 pages)  [Available online Literary Digest, Vol. 72, p. 32, 1922]

PAGE 21

Shoemaker, Henry W. ., [address on] “A Forgotten People, The Pennsylvania Mountaineers,” 1922. Before the Woman’s Club, Bellefonte, PA, April, 24th, 1922.

PAGE 22

Sipe, B.W.  “Danish Educators Take Port [sic] in Dedication of Folk School in W.N.C. : Experimental School For Young Adults Patterned After Danish Folk Schools Is Being Built In Brasstown Section, by B.W. Sipe, “John C. Campbell Folk School,” 1923

Norman, H.D., “The English of the Mountaineer,” Atlantic, 105:276-8 F., 1910.  [1923 ?]

PAGE 23

“Highways and Schools Sounding Death Knell of Mountain Dialect,” n.d.

Burton, James D. “Pathfinders of the Cumberlands, Presbyterian Banner, June 7, 1923

Bethea, Helen.  “Author is Spirit in Move for Mountain Schools,” Schools for Mountain Folk in Alabama,” by Helen Bethea. Courier Journal, December 16, 1923. Milford W. Howard Pictured Conditions In His Work, ‘Peggy Ware.’ Self-support is ideal.

PAGE 24

Ogg, Emma Jesse. “Dedication of Florence Stephenson Building,”, Asheville Home School, 1923

PAGE 25

McKaye, Percy. “Untamed America,” Survey Graphic, 1924.

PAGE 26 

“Kentucky Hits US in Four Places at Once (Drama in Kentucky)”, N.Y. Tribune, 1924.

PAGE 27

Issue of The Club Woman, Kentucky Federation of Women’s Clubs, Vol. 6, No.6, 1925. Includes articles: ” Berea Weaving, Fireside Industries,” .

PAGE 28

News Clippings: Caney Creek Community Center, 1925 ; Guerrant’s Stuart Robinson, Christian Observer, 1926.

Grasty, Thomas P.  Elkhorn Coking-Coal Field of Pike County Ky. (Thomas P. Grasty in Manufacturers’ Record of Baltimore), [printed in same year as the St. Louis World’s Fair.]

Wetmore, Susanna Robinson. poem “Appalachia: The Land of the Sky,” 1912. [printed c. 1925 ?]

“Help! Help! We Need Education” Is Mountaineer Youths’ Slogan: Southern Highland Boys Debate at Y.M.C.A. Sunday. Free to Public,” by The Chaperon.

“Waiting to Serve,” 1926

“Heart Problems From the Mountains. For the Christian Observer, Feb. 10, 1926.

PAGE 29

Simis, Albert [Alice Lloyd]. “Americans Who Never Saw the Stars and Stripes”, McClure’s Magazine, February [1926 ?]

PAGE 30

“Infant and Maternal Death Rates Lowered in Kentucky,” Bureau of Maternal and Child Health Doing Splendid Work Especially in Mountains, Lexington Herald,1926.

PAGE 31

“True Facts About Conditions in the Flood Area of the Mountains of Ky.” Flood, 1927

PAGE 32

Pikeville College Girls Do Much To Popularize Ballads As Sung By People of Kentucky Mountains,” Lexington Leader, April 1928

PAGE 33

“The School of the Ozarks, Were Money Has Little Place, Christian Science Monitor, Sept. 28, 1928. [Includes 3 photographs from article.]

PAGE 34

“Mountain Folk Revive Ancient Craft: In Jugtown, N.C., Colonial Pottery Tradition Lives Again — Biedermeier Furniture One “Modernist”. Jugtown Pottery

PAGE 35

“Blue Ridge Mountaineers Make Fascinating Gifts,” in This Modern World section of newspaper [?] 1928.

PAGE 36

Clark, Franklin. J., Rev. “Folk Schools in the Southern Mountains: Friends of our Southern Highlanders have followed the lead of a great Danish educator and established a Folk School at Brasstown.” [from The Spirit of Missions ?], n.d.

PAGE 37

“The Official Organ of …..Vol. XXXVI. No. 35, “Public Welfare Work in County To Begin Soon: Cherokee one of four counties chosen for Rockefeller Memorial Public Welfare Demonstration Work.in the Cherokee Scout” Clippings, (Dental Clinics)

PAGE 38

Program of Fifteenth Annual Conference of the Southern Mountain Workers, Knoxville, Tenn., March 29-30-31, 1927. S.M.W. with Questionnaire, 1927

“Some Shifting Aspects of Our Problem: The Questionnaire,” [Source is unknown – refers to Katharine Pettit’s “The Survey” of May 15, 1923.

“Mountain Workers Open Sessions: James L. Robb of Wesleyan, Is First Speaker, 1927. [Refers to the Fifteenth Annual Mountain Workers Conference held at Tennessee Wesleyan College in Athens.

PAGE 39

Program for the Sixteenth Annual Conference of Southern Mountain Workers, Knoxville, Tenn. March 20-21-22, 1928. Estabrook, A.A. “Is There a Mountain Problem, (Speech to Southern Mountain Workers Conference, 1928.

PAGE 40

Furman, Lucy. “The Quare Women, Taking the Night, Fourth of July,” Atlantic, Vol. 129, P. 756, 1922


 

“Danish Educators Take Part in Dedication of Folk School in W.N.C.” (19 ??)
Kentucky Federation of Women’s Clubs newsletter (1925)
de Long, Ethel “Doings on Troublesome” (1912)
“The English of the Mountaineer” by Henderson Daingerfield Norman (1923)
Clark, “Folk Schools [Brasstown] in the Southern Mountains” by Clark (192?)
“A Forgotten People: The Pennsylvania Mountaineer” by Shoemaker (????)
Frost, William G. “Our Contemporary Ancestors in the Southern Mountains” (1890)
Frost, William G. “Educational Rally at Big Stone Gap” ‘Ladder of Success’ speech (????)
Frost William G. “Southern Mountaineer: Our Kindred of the Boone and Lincoln Type” (1900)
Frost, William G. “In the Southern Mountains” (1898)
“A Glimpse of the Kentucky Mountains,” about Pine Mountain (1921)
“Highways and Schools Sounding the Death Knell of Mountain Dialect” (n.d.)
McKaye, Percy. “Kentucky Hits Us in Four Places at Once” (1924)
“Mountain Music” by Winifried Kirkland (1929)
“Mr. Campbell Once Said … ,” review of The Southern Highlander …by Ethel deLong (1911)
Burton, James D. “Pathfinders of the Cumberlands” (1923)
“Indignant Over the Perry County Pardons” (1910)
“On the Banks of the Red Bird” (n.d.)
“Are You Too Old to Learn” [Moonlight Schools] (1920)
Bradley, William Aspenwall. “The Women On Troublesome” (1898)

Semple, Ellen Churchill. “The Anglo-Saxons of the Kentucky Mountains: A Study in Anthropogeography, The Geographical Journal, Vol. XVII, January to June, 1901. Accessed online November 02, 2016.

A Mountain Farm Girl” (1922)
“School for Mountain Folk in Alabama” (1923)
“Asheville Home School.” Asheville Normal (1923)
“School Ma’am of Sandy Ridge” & Response (1920-21)
“Danish Educators Take Part in Dedication of Folk School in W.N.C.” (19 ??)
Kentucky Federation of Women’s Clubs newsletter (1925)
de Long, Ethel “Doings on Troublesome” (1912)
Norman, Henderson Daingerfield.  “The English of the Mountaineer” (1923)
Clark,      “Folk Schools [Brasstown] in the Southern Mountains” by Clark (192?)
Shoemaker,      .“A Forgotten People: The Pennsylvania Mountaineer” by Shoemaker (????)
Frost, William G. “Our Contemporary Ancestors in the Southern Mountains” (1890)
Frost, William G. “Educational Rally at Big Stone Gap” ‘Ladder of Success’ speech (????)
Frost William G. “Southern Mountaineer: Our Kindred of the Boone and Lincoln Type” (1900)
Frost, William G. “In the Southern Mountains” (1898)
“A Glimpse of the Kentucky Mountains,” about Pine Mountain (1921)
“Highways and Schools Sounding the Death Knell of Mountain Dialect” (n.d.)
McKaye, Percy. “Kentucky Hits Us in Four Places at Once” (1924)
Kirkland, Winifried. “Mountain Music” (1929)
“Mr. Campbell Once Said … ,” review of The Southern Highlander …by Ethel deLong (1911)
Burton, James D. “Pathfinders of the Cumberlands” (1923)
“Indignant Over the Perry County Pardons” (1910)
“On the Banks of the Red Bird” (n.d.)
“Are You Too Old to Learn” [Moonlight Schools] (1920)
Bradley, William Aspenwall. “The Women On Troublesome” (1898)
Semple, Ellen Churchill. “The Anglo-Saxons of the Kentucky Mountains: A Study in Anthropogeography, The Geographical Journal, Vol. XVII, January to June, 1901. Accessed online November 02, 2016.


 


SEE ALSO: 

INDEX TO GUIDES

GUIDE TO SCRAPBOOKS

GUIDE TO SCRAPBOOK TO 1929

GUIDE TO LOCAL HISTORY SCRAPBOOK 1920-1980